Can We Make More Hours in a Day?

by Phil Petru, Assistant Head of School

I am sure you have thought to yourself, maybe more than once, “I wish I had more hours in the day.” I know I have. While balancing both personal and professional responsibilities, many times I find myself wondering, “Where has this day gone?”

I wish I had more hours in the day

I can tell you from personal experience that teachers are always trying to find new and innovative ways to maximize the instructional minutes during the school day. Excellent schools, like The Langley School, look for ways to balance the academic program (math, language arts, social studies, science, and specials) with our students’ well-being (structured and unstructured times for student interactions such as lunch, breaks, and recess). Though school schedules might look simple, they are really complex road maps that truly impact teachers’ decisions about their instruction. The length of the class period, the time of the class during the day (morning or afternoon), and the sequence of classes (does it come before or after lunch or recess?) during the day are just some of the considerations that teachers think about when planning lessons.

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From New Student to Langley Ambassador

By Cory McLucas, Eighth Grade Langley Student

About three years ago, I transferred to The Langley School. I was entering sixth grade and knew no one. I was nervous, scared, and had no idea what to expect. I was worried that I would not fit in and would not be able to make new friends. Fortunately, all these feelings were washed away within the first days of school. When I walked into Langley on that first day, I was immediately greeted by students and teachers who showed me where my classes were, sat with me at lunch, and went out of their way to make sure I felt comfortable. Even though many of my classmates had known each other for years, Langley’s warm and welcoming atmosphere made it easy for me to fit in. After only one week of school, I felt as though I was a part of the school’s community and no longer felt like I was the “new kid.” I had new friends and felt accepted at my new school.

cory-mclucasAs an eighth-grader, I found myself wanting to share my experience of switching to The Langley School with prospective students and parents. The student ambassador program gave me that opportunity.  Every year, a small group of Middle School students are chosen as student ambassadors. I am one of these students. As a student ambassador, I get to communicate my experiences to families interested in the school. Since I transferred to Langley in Middle School, I can relate to many families and tell them how easy it is to make the switch to Langley.

Student ambassadors are dedicated to the positive promotion of The Langley School. We work with the Admission Office and help with events held for prospective families. At information sessions, we give parent tours, answer questions, and make sure we show parents the highlights of our school. We host students who come for a shadow visit. We also help out at school events like the Fall Fair and Grandparents & Special Friends Day. Recently, we went on a field trip to The Lab School in Washington, DC. At The Lab School, we went on a tour and got a different perspective on what makes a good tour guide. We learned a lot from this which will help us improve our ability to interact with others and better promote our school.langley-tour

As a student ambassador, I am learning many things. It has helped me improve my interview skills, made it easier for me to interact with people I don’t know, and made me appreciate the positive and welcoming Langley community. It also made me realize that I want to go to a high school that has a similar community where I can feel both challenged and supported at the same time.

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Where Vital Academics Meet a Deep Respect for Childhood

by Ayesha Flaherty, Parent and Administrator at The Langley School

Focusing our children’s attention on academic success is critically important to us as parents. And while we seek, encourage, and reward academic activities and accomplishments, we also want our children to retain the joy of being children.

We know that no single model or methodology can universally achieve this perfect balance. However, at The Langley School, the essence of who we are and what drives our curricular decisions is guided by our mission to seek this important, and necessary, balance.

What “vital academics” means at Langley

The word “vital” is defined as “absolutely necessary or important; essential.” When it comes to educating our children, making the trade-offs on how they spend their time and what skills and values are prioritized makes all the difference. That’s why The Langley School stays agile enough to respond to the most vital 21st-century skills. We invest heavily in professional development for our teachers and regularly review our teaching instruction and curriculum, building our students’ schedule and experiences with their futures in mind.

For example, we practice collaboration starting at a young age through our Big Buddy program. We teach empathy through our formal service learning program. We enforce digital citizenship to embed safe habits. We approach lessons with essential questions to spur innovation.

The secondary definition of vital is “full of energy; lively.” If you’ve ever set foot on Langley’s campus, you have witnessed the palpable sense of joy on every corner of campus. As one 2015 Langley graduate stated, “Langley was a place I could come and be assured that I would be safe, comfortable, and most importantly, happy. I feel blessed to have grown up at such a school.”

Guided by a deep respect for childhood

At The Langley School, we believe that childhood isn’t just a stage to pass through – but it is a period of crucial, foundational learning. From age 3 to early adolescence, there is steep cognitive and interpersonal growth. Our teachers are experts in this critical period of development and celebrate childhood while giving their students a solid foundation on which to build.

Where vital academics meet a deep respect for childhood.

This phrase captures our identity as a school. At Langley, you don’t have to choose; you can have both. Another 2015 Langley graduate summed it up best: “Of course I learned a lot academically at Langley, but I’ve also learned life lessons like how to work with other people, how to make lasting friendships, and how to be kind and tolerant.”

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